Morley Civic Society

It was very interesting to read about Councillor Judith Elliot, and her planning row with Morrisons. Morrisons have extended their Plants and flowers section into their trolley store, without gaining planning permission from Leeds City Council. Which means that the trolleys will have be stored elsewhere. The car park next to Morrisons is owned by Leeds City Council. Will they be storing these trolleys on Leeds City Council property, rent free?
Morrisons opened in 1972, perhaps, in this year of the Queens Diamond jubilee, Morrisons will be donating some of their expertise to put something back into its local community? One can always wish, but it was once the case. Just over the road from Morrisons there is Scatcherd Park and Morley Hall, which were both given to the people of Morley by wealthy beneficiaries, Oliver Scatcherd and Charles Scarth.

In 1967 Morrisons became a public limited company listed on the London Stock Exchange. The store in Morley is one that makes a million pounds, year after year. Perhaps they should put something back into the local community? In Dartmouth Park there are some old, in need of replacement park benches, that were donated by various members of the Morley Civic Society. A few park benches shouldn’t break the bank for a company that earns so much from Morley.

Wealthy beneficiaries, do they still exist?

It was very interesting to read about Councillor Judith Elliot, and her planning row with Morrisons. Morrisons have extended their Plants and flowers section into their trolley store, without gaining planning permission from Leeds City Council. Which means that the trolleys will have be stored elsewhere. The car park next to Morrisons is owned by Leeds City Council. Will they be storing these trolleys on Leeds City Council property?

Morrisons opened in 1972, perhaps, in this year of the Queens Diamond jubilee, Morrisons will be donating some of their expertise to put something back into its local community? One can always wish, but it was once the case. Just over the road from Morrisons there is Scatcherd Park and Morley Hall, which were both given to the people of Morley by wealthy beneficiaries, Oliver Scatcherd and Charles Scarth.

In 1967 Morrisons became a public limited company listed on the London Stock Exchange, perhaps on its celebration of its 50th year, it will give a little something back? The planning regulations are there for the interests of all, perhaps others traders in Morley will close down in the light of this extra competition, or perhaps they would like notice of expansion so that they could buckle down and compete harder?

Simplify the VAT system?

What a rip off. George Osbourne wants to “simplify the VAT system”. But he seems to want to simplify it upwards, on everyday goods too. Other countries have higher rates of VAT than the UK, and that is a good way to raise money. But surely everyday food items should not be subject to VAT.

The following products are now subject to VAT – biscuits, nuts, crisps, roasted chicken, cornish pasties and bottled water. An ideal way to help those with the least money is to “simplify the VAT system”; to zero rate those everyday items. I do have an alternative list of things to include in the VAT system, that are currently zero rated – antiques, works of art and Financial services (money transactions, loans/credits, savings/deposits, shares/bonds). And one last thing that should incur VAT, newspapers.

Morley Railway stations facilities

In 2003, plans were in place to upgrade Morley Railway station’s facilities, Morley Town Council successfully lobbied to get some improvements. But Morleys railway station is still way behind the minimum standards of other stations and probably not compliant with the The Equality Act 2010; which bans unfair treatment of those with disabilities and helps achieve equal opportunities in the workplace and in wider society. Patronage at Morley station has increased remarkably in recent years. Recorded usage in 2002/03 was 27,296 journeys per year, that increased by more than 250% in the following four years up to 2006.

Despite this commuter growth, very little has been done to bring this station into the 21st century. For example, there is no visual live passenger information, only one platform is accessible for disabled passengers, there is insufficient parking and there is no a taxi rank; all of which combine to make the station not as user friendly and pleasant as other stations in West Yorkshire. Even some bus stops have live visual passenger information. Morleys railway station is less than a mile away from the town centre, surely a very important part of Morleys infrastructure. Since Ed Balls is our MP, I will forward this email to him so that he can take up the case with Network Rail.

 

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